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News Update Monday 11th January

Training Focus

Monday: Hijiate & Self Defence

Tuesday: Tenshinage & Sword

Wednesday: Nikkajo & Ukemi

Thursday: Kotegaeshi & Dynamic

Friday: Shihonage & Jo

Saturday Shomen Iriminage & Tanto

Style Vs Style Pt. 1

Martial arts has always had a very broad meaning. Martial arts may refer to karate, aikido, judo, ju jitsu, kung fu, tai chi, tae kwon do, hapkido, kendo — in fact, there are hundreds, perhaps thousands of styles of martial arts. Some are well-developed, well known styles taught in schools internationally, while many styles are indigenous to a specific rural village, taught and practiced only there for centuries and unknown to the rest of the world. Some arts specialize in kicking, while other focus on hand strikes and trapping. Some are throwing arts and others grapple — concentrating primarily on ground fighting. Although these styles and systems vary in origin — coming from China, Okinawa, Japan, Korea, as well as from other countries throughout Asia and elsewhere — they all teach martial technique, either empty handed or with a weapon.

Only a small number of these styles have successfully migrated to America, and only a fraction of those have come to the general public’s awareness. A particular style gains popularity almost exclusively through the media — specifically movies and TV — quickly gains a small following and grows in popularity only when it is successfully marketed or championed by a Hollywood star or professional athlete.

Modern History

The popularity of martial arts in the West over the past 50 years has its roots in the experiences of military servicemen returning to the U.S. at the end of the Korean War in the early 1950’s. Exposed for the first time to traditional Asian forms of empty-handed fighting and self-defence, these combat-trained soldiers were as fascinated by its efficiency and effectiveness as they were by its grace. Returning servicemen were among the first westerners in the U.S. to open martial arts schools.

The relative popularity of various martial arts styles has risen and fallen with the times. Throughout the 1950s and 60s, the Judo craze mesmerized audiences with throws and locks. By the late 1960s and 70s, we saw the rise of Karate, a powerful striking art, and Kung Fu, popularized by Bruce Lee and, later, by the American TV series of the same name. Hundreds of thousands of students throughout the U.S. flocked to dojos to learn these mysterious new fighting arts. Words like ninja and sensei entered the general English vocabulary.

In the 1980s, a Korean art – Tae Kwon Do — burst upon the scene. One master was asked, “How did Tae Kwon Do become so popular?” His reply? “If I break a brick with my hand, it looks good, but if I throw a brick in the air and break it with a kick – that looks more impressive. Americans want to be able to defend themselves, but they also want to look good doing it.” Martial arts-inspired fight scenes became more and more prevalent in mainstream Hollywood movies. A whole generation of kids grew up watching the animated TV show, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles.

No-Holds-Bared Competition

In the 1990s, the popularity of Brazilian Ju Jitsu coincided with the introduction of Ultimate Fighting, a contest that claimed to settle the age-old question, “Which martial art is the best?” Ultimate Fighting promised to end speculation, conjecture and arguments; it would all be settled in a cage. And, after winning match after match, Brazilian Ju Jitsu, as practiced by the Gracie family, consistently came out on top, appearing to be the style to beat. Ten years later, Ultimate Fighting has become an international sport, watched by millions around the world. Top competitors train hard, and Brazilian Ju Jitsu is just one successful style among many. Today, there are as many knock-outs as tap-outs. Grapplers are punching and strikers are grappling. It can be said that the lasting legacy of the Gracie family was to make the martial arts world address the issue of what to do when you are taken to the ground. Ultimate Fighting has become much less a contest of style vs. style, and much more a test of one particular fighter’s ability vs. another’s.

Given this history, it is easy to understand that people who have never studied martial arts see the entire practice as fighting. It’s only natural. Martial arts were introduced to the West in general and to the U.S. in particular by former soldiers who viewed the art as an effective mean of self-defence. And, if you view these as fighting arts, then it’s no surprise that the question arises, “If one style fought another, which would win?”

If you think about it, you’ll see that the question itself is beside the point. All authentic styles and systems teach self-defence skills necessary to take a confrontational situation under control or allow you to defend yourself if attacked. But people are rarely attacked in everyday life by professional fighters, or by trained martial artists. Most attacks are perpetrated by a punk or thug with a quick temper, often under the influence of drugs and/or alcohol. So, which style is the most effective? From a self-defence perspective, virtually all authentic styles will work.

Part 2 next week.

Weekly Quote

Don’t worry about failures, worry about the chances you miss when you don’t even try.

Jack Canfield

Osu,

Sensei Matt Thurman – Aikido Nottingham

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News Update Tuesday 11th November

Training Focus

Here is the training focus for the rest of the week:

Tuesday: Nikkajo & Tanto

Wednesday: Hijiate & Self Defence

Thursday: Tenshinage & Sword

Friday: Kotegaeshi & Dynamic Practice

Saturday: Shomen Iriminage & Free Practice

Kids’ Modules

In the month of November the Kids are being tested on Module 2 of their curriculum

Junior/Cadet

Little Dragons

November Mat Chat Themes

Event Updates

Outdoor Self Defence

We need an idea of how many people are going to be attending the event! If you are going to be coming along and if you are bringing friends please let us know as soon as possible.

Dog Walk

The dog walk is CANCELLED!

Quote

Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life; define yourself.”

Harvey Fierstein

Osu,

Sensei Matt Thurman – Aikido Nottingham

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Balance Through Discipline

External discipline

One of the greatest benefits of studying martial arts is greater self-discipline and self-control. From birth, discipline is a part of the human experience. Imposed on us by caring parents and relatives, discipline teaches us to make wise choices. Teachers, coaches, law enforcement officials, and other authority figures soon add their influence. External discipline is used frequently to obtain compliance in the military, prisons, religious orders or any regulated environment requiring specific behaviors. It canbe an effective method to control individuals, but when the authority figure or consequence  disappears, often we realize that the behavior was just being controlled rather than transformed, or repressed rather than rehabilitated.

Freedom is born of self-discipline. The undisciplined man is a slave to his own weaknesses.

Internal discipline

As we mature, we realize the importance of self-imposed discipline or internal discipline. For example, eating well and exercising usually maintains our health. Building a successful career demands discipline of our time. Financial success requires the discipline to save and invest regularly. In our culture, certain holidays and rituals inspire us to become more disciplined. Birthdays, our annual reminder of the passing of time, can be an opportunity to acknowledge what we have accomplished, as well as what we have not. Without a doubt, the most popular time of the year for assessing our lives and vowing change is January 1st. The beginning of a new year gives us a fresh slate for new resolutions, and millions of people participate in this annual ritual. But well over 90% of us give up on our sincere and heartfelt visions within months. This confirms the need for commitment, follow-through and good old  fashioned self-discipline.

Continuous action

Start investing the time and energy needed to design the life you desire in great detail. Then take continuous action on that design, never stopping until you reach your goals. If you are thinking that this seems really hard, you are right. However, everything in life is hard. Being poor, sick or uneducated is difficult as well. You have a choice: Take control of your life, making it satisfying and rewarding, or allow circumstances and outside forces to determine your future, and ultimately, your life.

We must all suffer one of two things: The pain of discipline or the pain of regret and disappointment.

Discipline will keep you training when the going gets tough, when things get repetitive. Discipline will keep you moving forward in your practice. Discipline will get you to Black Belt and beyond. The journey to Black Belt will change your life.

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News Update Monday 29th October

Training Focus

This week is Gradings and Curriculum practice. Get on the mat and get your next promotion!

Measuring Your Progress

So how do you maintain a high level of training and stay so passionate about the art? It can’t be based on mere accomplishment. Progress must be measured by more than just rank or how well you perform in class. You need to take an honest look at yourself. Are you are healthier and stronger, do you have less stress and feel more confident to make the hard decisions in your life?
Real martial arts changes you, changes the way you deal with all aspects of your life. The hours spent in gruelling classes do more than teach you how to fight – they strengthen your will. Living through the bumps and bruises of practice helps teach you that you will live through the bumps and bruises of life. You learn that you don’t have to quit something just because it is hard. You learn that, with patience, perseverance and hard work, anything is possible. The hours in meditation teach you to stay calm and centred in the drama of your day-to-day life. Finally, there is an overwhelming conviction that stems from accomplishing something that you never thought you could, that allows you to say “I can.” “I can do anything that I set my mind to do.” No, you’re not a superhero, you can’t leap tall buildings in a single bound, nor are you an emotionless drone that is steeled against the world and unaffected by problems. Martial artists are still just people; Moms and dads, employees and employers, sons and daughters and neighbours and students. The difference is that martial artists know how to focus their energy, and they possess a calm strength that comes from knowing that anything is possible with sufficient strength of will.

Since we all have different backgrounds and different levels of fitness; since some of us are athletic and others uncoordinated and some are flexible while most are stiff; since some concentrate intensely while others minds drift; since some practice hard and come regular, while others struggle with attendance; since there are so many differences between us – it is ridiculous to compare yourself to anyone else, and to do so will only enhance your ego or jeopardize your practice.

Osu

Sensei Matt Thurman, Shudokan Black Belt Academy – Aikido Nottingham

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When Are You a Martial Artist?

More than a belt

Once you begin to study martial arts, when are you a martial artist? Do you qualify after your first introductory class? Or are you a martial artist after you enroll in a school and become an active student? Maybe you are not a martial artist until you learn a few techniques well. Do you have to take your first test? Are you a martial artist when you reach green belt?                And, of course, all black belts are martial artists, aren’t they?

This is a difficult question. An easier question is, “When do you think that you are a martial artist?” To answer the question, we must examine the true meaning of being a real martial artist. Frankly, most people believe the moment is when they put on the uniform. Becoming a martial artist, however, requires much more than wearing a uniform. Participating in exercise fitness classes, throwing punches and kicks to the latest pop music doesn’t makeyou a martial artist either.  Neither will you become a martial artist by training with bouncers and bodyguards, cagematch bullies, and bad-tempered tough guys capable of pounding someone into dust.

Are you collecting techniques or perfecting the details?

The aim in this topic is not to give a definitive answer to the question of when you become a real martial artist. Instead, the intent is to offer ideas that encourage you to think about your practice. After years of serious study, you will begin to profoundly understand what it means to be a martial artist.

In the beginning of your practice, no matter the style or discipline, you learn basic techniques. Basic techniques are the building blocks or foundation of the system. Through continuous repetition of the basics, you will become a technician. Adding intermediate or even advanced techniques to your repertoire does not make you an artist. You simply become a technician with more tools. Many people develop habits of consciously or unconsciously collecting new techniques. Indeed, learning new techniques is exciting…new punches, new kicks, and new forms. But, you must learn to enjoy the basics.  In order to develop the essence of the art, you must learn to concentrate on the details.              As you practice, ask yourself, “Is my hand right?        Am I striking with the right surface?        Am I relaxed until the moment of focus? Did I drive through my target? Did I recover quickly? Is my stance right?”

Perfecting all the details is an important aspect of the art. After all, a student who has practiced more than five years should know, not only more techniques, but his basic skills should be better than one who has practiced for only a year. A student of ten years should have even better basics than one who has practiced for five years…after twenty years, better still.

Martial arts…not martial arts

Two words describe our practice: ‘Martial’ and ‘arts’. The definition of the first word, ‘martial’, is certain. The meaning is, “of, pertaining to, or suggesting war,” and unfortunately describes the prevalent view of martial arts. Today, most people relate martial arts to violence of some sort. We usually ignore or forget the second word, ‘art,’ in the context of martial arts. Art suggests spontaneous creativity, a changing of consciousness, beauty and elegance. Art inspires us and adds to our life.

Martial arts or fighting?

So what distinguishes martial arts from any other violence and fighting techniques performed since the beginning of time?  Martial arts began in the sixth century with Tamo Bodidharma, a Shaolin monk. In a simple monastery in Hunan Province, China, Tamo realized that martial techniques, if practiced with the correct mindset, could be used for much more than just self-defense. Tamo pushed the monks to challenge themselves to greater heights, forcing them to break through limitations and develop their bodies in remarkable ways. By concentrating to master difficult physical moves, students learned to better focus their minds.  More importantly, they cultivated powerful discipline and will, which changed their self-image. The earlier picture of simple monks, overweight and lethargic, transformed to one of acutely focused individuals, living up to their personal convictions and beliefs. Under the guidance of Tamo Bodidharma, these first practitioners integrated deep introspection, meditation and physical techniques to create a complete practice that is now known as martial arts.

Bringing ancient principles into modern life

By practicing martial arts, as those monks did so long ago, you also begin to realize your own power in life. Diligently practicing the art, you change your self-image, becoming more confident in all situations. You see yourself as strong willed and focused. You know that you are mentally tough, and able to overcome obstacles and achieve goals. A           real martial artist is a martial artist in and outside of the dojo. You do not become a superman or superwoman, never hesitating or fearing anything, but rather a person of discipline, fully conscious and aware of all thoughts, feelings, emotions, moods and actions. In all moments, you maintain control, or at the very least, you are able to regain control of yourself quickly.

Don’t think so much

Artists use the term “blocked,” to describe periods when they are unable to move forward. Writers can’t write, painters can’t paint, and musicians cannot compose. This block usually comes from an overwhelming or nagging pressure originating in the mind. Uncontrolled thoughts manifest as self-talk such as, “I used to be creative, but I fear that I’ll never have another good idea. I don’t feel inspired-what if people don’t like what I do? What if I fail?” As a martial artist executing a form, you might tell your- self, “Everyone is watching, don’t screw up. Here comes the hard part. Wow, I did that really well!” During sparring, your inner dialogue might consist of anticipating your partner’s moves and planning how you will respond. “A back fist is coming next…he always throws a back fist after this technique. Here comes a roundhouse kick…as soon as he moves, I’ll hit him,” and so on and so on.  The inner chatter constantly flows, so we must deliberately train our minds to slow down and stay in the moment.

Surrender to your practice

Our desire to perform or produce excellence is precisely what inhibits our art. If you are concerned with ‘it’        coming from you, then you are not able to get out of the way and let ‘it’              happen. For ‘it’ to come, you must become a spectator of your performance, rather than merely focusing on the outcome. How does one reach the state of being and not doing? Ueshiba Sensei said, “Let spirit flow through you.” You must learn to meditate deeply, clearing the mind of all thought, and remain still. Only then are you able to bring a calm peaceful state into your practice. By keeping the mind calmly active and actively calm, the artist responds, rather than anticipates. The artist harmonizes and does not force. Art comes without effort. Surrender to the practice, without judgment, and just be.

Changing consciousness

A Zendo (a place where the philosophy of Zen is shared) inspires change of consciousness, but does not teach martial application. Self-defense teaches martial application, but does not change consciousness. Real martial arts taught in a dojo (a place of enlightenment) uses martially effective techniques to teach self-defense and to change consciousness. The Japanese tea ceremony, performed correctly, produces a fine cup of tea in the end, but the primary aim is to inspire one to be more mindful…to experience life fully, moment by moment.

In that moment when you are a martial artist, spirit is flowing through you, raising your consciousness.  Strive to stay in that state, consciously and consistently, throughout life.

The art through you…not from you

A martial artist understands and consistently uses the principles, both physical and mental, of his art to raise consciousness and increase mindfulness in every act. With great compassion and humility, a martial artist recognizes that the art comes through him but not from hindrance, he has but one job: To remove himself. Bruce Lee said, “Let it happen.”

So, can one simply proclaim that he is a martial artist and thus become one? Or are we only martial artists, when we learn to get out of the way and allow the practice to transform us?

A student asked a great master, “Sir, do you know martial arts? The master responded, “No, I study martial arts, and when I am still, it flows through me.”

Remember that you cannot skip steps. All great artists of any discipline were first great technicians. After years of dedication, unceasingly perfecting their skill, and learning to still their mind, art found them.

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Lessons in Mindfulness: Balance Through Discipline

External discipline

One of the greatest benefits of studying martial arts is greater self-discipline and self-control. From birth, discipline is a part of the human experience. Imposed on us by caring parents and relatives, discipline teaches us to make wise choices. Teachers, coaches, law enforcement officials, and other authority figures soon add their influence. External discipline is used frequently to obtain compliance in the military, prisons, religious orders or any regulated environment requiring specific behaviors. It canbe an effective method to control individuals, but when the authority figure or consequence  disappears, often we realize that the behavior was just being controlled rather than transformed, or repressed rather than rehabilitated.

Freedom is born of self-discipline. The undisciplined man is a slave to his own weaknesses.

–Alan Valentine

Internal discipline

As we mature, we realize the importance of self-imposed discipline or internal discipline. For example, eating well and exercising usually maintains our health. Building a successful career demands discipline of our time. Financial success requires the discipline to save and invest regularly. In our culture, certain holidays and rituals inspire us to become more disciplined. Birthdays, our annual reminder of the passing of time, can be an opportunity to acknowledge what we have accomplished, as well as what we have not. Without a doubt, the most popular time of the year for assessing our lives and vowing change is January 1st. The beginning of a new year gives us a fresh slate for new resolutions, and millions of people participate in this annual ritual. But well over 90% of us give up on our sincere and heartfelt visions within months. This confirms the need for commitment, follow-through and good old  fashioned self-discipline.

Continuous action

Start investing the time and energy needed to design the life you desire in great detail. Then take continuous action on that design, never stopping until you reach your goals. If you are thinking that this seems really hard, you are right. However, everything in life is hard. Being poor, sick or uneducated is difficult as well. You have a choice: Take control of your life, making it satisfying and rewarding, or allow circumstances and outside forces to determine your future, and ultimately, your life.

We must all suffer one of two things: The pain of discipline or the pain of regret and disappointment.

–E. James Rohn

Shift…don’t run

There is a saying, “Environment is stronger than will.” This is a great truth, and as a student of the martial arts, you belong to a powerful environment which demands concentration, thrives on discipline, and pushes its students toward immense mental and physical growth.  The challenge of such an intense pursuit is to keep everything in balance. How does one build a career, enjoy family and social life, maintain good health, achieve financial stability and grow spiritually at the same time?

Think of a man on a tight wire, thirty feet above the city. He never achieves absolute balance, but constantly shifts from side to side to maintain his position. You must  continuously monitor your life, and adjust when necessary. Determine the best places to invest your time, energy and resources. If you run from one fire to the next all day, you become exhausted and completely unsatisfied. By disciplining your time, thoughts and behaviors, you feel organized and productive.

Something in human nature causes us to start slacking off at our moment of greatest accomplishment.  As you become successful, you will need a great deal of self-discipline not to lose your sense of balance, humility, focus and commitment.

           –Unknown

Balance and passion

A question that many people struggle with is, “How do I have balance and passion in my life at the same time?” The question suggests that the pursuit of a great passion requires total devotion of time and energy,  causing the rest of your life to suffer.      A great martial artist strives for balance and harmony in every aspect.  Simplify your life and spend your time rather than wasting time. Learn to live in the moment and give your full attention to the now. Design your life to be harmonious with your deepest desires. When your time and energy move in the exact same direction, there is a congruency…a synergy to life. In short, discipline equals happiness.

Discipline is simply doing what you ought to do, even when you don’t want to do it.

Osu,

Shudokan Black Belt Academy – Aikido Nottingham

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Mushin Part 2

Let “IT” Happen!

Some of the greatest martial artists in the world — Ueshiba, Funakoshi, Chojun Miyagi — they were in their absolute prime in their 70’s and 80’s. That’s unheard of for an athlete. A gymnast is in their prime in their teens. Most athletes think about retiring in their mid-30’s, by 45 they’re coaching, by 60 they’re consulting, and in their 70’s they’re remembering and watching it on TV. How in the world can martial artists be in their prime at 70 and 80 years old? They can’t do more push ups. They’re not stronger than they were at 25. They aren’t more flexible. They aren’t faster. The only way these people can remain in the prime of their practice with a body well past its peak is because, at the highest levels, martial arts is a mental discipline.

A young, strong, fast martial artist fires a front punch at you and you, as a young, strong, fast martial artist yourself, are able to sidestep or get out of the way of the punch. And an old 80 year old master has the same punch thrown at him and is also able to get out of the way of the punch. To the naked eye, it appears to be the exact same occurrence, but it’s really not. At some point before impact, the young practitioner recognizes the punch being thrown and, with quick reflexes, is able to move out of the way, or block or counter with a technique of their own. But the old master isn’t that nimble, isn’t that quick. Yes, he is able to recognize the punch so much more quickly than the young man that it compensates somewhat for slower movement or less flexibility. But there’s more going on. As the punch is coming in, the old master’s mind is truly in that moment, and so the punch is not moving at 80 mph, 90 mph. In his mind, the punch is moving is slow motion. Not because he’s concentrating intently — quite the opposite. His mind is clear, like a still pond. When the water is like glass, when everything is completely still, then the tiniest movement produces a ripple that we sense instantly and clearly. But if the water is choppy and splashing and moving about, then that same tiny movement is lost — you don’t feel it at all.

It is often desires that keep us from living in the moment, for they can only be fulfilled in the future.

Your mind is that pond. When you clear your mind completely, then you will recognize every tiny ripple very clearly and much earlier, and be able to spontaneously and creatively respond. Bruce Lee said “It’s when IT happens.” Ueshiba Sensei said “It’s when Spirit flows through you.” That’s the state of Mushin — no-mind — that we are striving for.

I’ll give you an example. You’re driving down the road 50, 60 mph and you hit a piece of ice and the car starts to spin and you know you’re going to hit the telephone pole. What happens? Everything slows down, doesn’t it. Why? It’s because your fear has put you right in the moment. You aren’t thinking about the argument with your wife. You’re not thinking about getting your child off to school. You’re not thinking about the meeting at 11:00. You’re not thinking at all. This is Mushin. You are right there, completely in that moment, to the exclusion of everything else. Your consciousness changes and your perception of time-flow changes with it. Now imagine being able to control when you go into that state.

Creativity is when you get out of the way and the Divine shines through.

24 / 7 – 365

Understand that this state is not exclusive to martial artists. I’ve said for years that Michael Jordan does not love basketball. Baryshnikov does not love ballet. Mohammed Ali does not love boxing. They loved the state of consciousness they were able to achieve when performing these activities. Michael Jordan was asked in an interview, “What is the number one thing that you miss about playing since you’ve retired?” And he said, “I miss the quiet, the peacefulness. When I was on the court, playing, it was the quietest place in the world.” The reporter seemed confused and said, “But Mr. Jordan, thousands of people were watching you, sometimes screaming and jumping up and down. You had announcers and music and loudspeakers and hundreds of thousands watching on T.V. How was that the quietest place?”

“I can’t explain it,” said Jordan. “It just was.”

In his mind, he was so completely focused right there, in that moment, that everything else was gone. In Mushin, there is no past and there is no future. There is only now. We have created this concept of linear time, of 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, 7 days in a week. We all agree on the rules and we use it, we need it, to interact with one another and create societies. But it’s an artificial structure that bears no resemblance to the way our minds really work. Linear time has no bearing on consciousness.

In Mushin, there’s only this moment. And in this moment, duality ceases. There is no up or down, no left or right, no good or bad, no right or wrong. There just is. And then, from that state of centred calm, you react spontaneously and creatively. It happens and, when you’re able to let it happen, you cannot take credit for it. A great master said, “You don’t throw the punch. You don’t do the block. It happens to you. You are a conduit at best.”

Most teachers’ advice is think, think, and think. The zen masters advice is stop thinking.

Of course, if you’re performing technique incorrectly, then it could be that you need more physical practice. But at a certain point, your body can do it. What goes awry is that you’re thinking too much about it. You’re considering too many cases of either-or. You’re trying too hard.

Prepare, then Let Go

Sometimes, we really prepare for a situation that’s coming. A speech, a test, an event, a spotlight moment. We prepare intently. We make sure we have all our ducks in a row. We really understand our topic and we know what we’re going to do. And we still choke. Why? It’s because our minds become cluttered with all the thoughts, all the possibilities of things that could go right or wrong. We’re trying too hard. The water is too choppy. We have to just let go and let it happen. I’m not saying that you should not prepare. Preparation is very, very important. But once you’ve prepared and you’re ready and the moment comes to perform, then you have to let go. The struggle culminates in surrender. In Mushin, we’re surrendering to the consciousness of no-mind.  The chatter ceases and only the moment matters. We are no longer there, except as a part of the  universe. And so the universe is moving through us, with us.

In martial arts, whenever you attack, you’re thinking. You cannot enter the state of Mushin if you’re striving to attack. You must be defensive, but not calculating, not anticipating the other person’s movement or motion. You have to truly just be. You have to wait and be. The essence of Mushin lies in the breath. The breath and the mind are inseparable. The condition of one directly reflects the condition of the other. As your breathing slows, your mind slows. As your mind slows, the waters grow calm, turn to glass, and you’re able to touch that state of no-mind, the state that is going to help you not only in your practice, but every day throughout your life.

It is your thoughts that decide where you go as well as hinder you from knowing who you really are.

 Osu,

Sensei Matt, Shudokan Black Belt Academy – Aikido Nottingham

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News Update & Training Focus Monday 27th February

Focus for the Week

Monday; Shomen Iriminage

Tuesday; Ikkajo

Wednesday; Nikkajo
Thursday; Sankajo
Friday; Yonkajo & Bokken
Saturday; Shihonage/Tenchinage & Jo

Dates For The Diary

Safety & Awareness Course

Friday 23rd March, 18:30.

This event is open to friends and guests so please bring others along. The evening class will be a course in the more preventative measures we should take in our self defence and take a look at the sort of things that may have to be dealt with in the workplace as opposed to the street.

Black Belt Testing

Saturday 24th March, 12:30

Those testing in march are Sensei Matt & Martin Watt.

Please come along to show your support for the work put in and the end result. Black belt is off ten seen as the ultimate goal in martial arts and as a result it is all to easy to lose your way once you have achieved this great trophy. Be part of the audience that you would hope for when it’s your turn.

Osu,

Sensei Matt, Shudokan Black Belt Academy – Aikido Nottingham

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News Update Thursday 16th February

Dates for the Diary

Power Hour

Friday 24th February 

The aim is to demonstrate everything we do in one lesson. For current students this a brilliant reminder of the massive spectrum that we have to offer, for new people and guests see this as a chance to get to experience everything we do in Shudokan Aikido.

So to existing students, please bring a friend. To starngers, please come on down.

Bestwood Park

Saturday 25th February

On Saturday afternoon we are going for a stroll through Bestwood Park. We are meeting ath the Coach House in the park at 13:30 and the whole walk should take about 2 hours. Please bring family friends and the dog. Ooh and the camera as well.

Mother’s Day Training

Friday 16th March

Because families that flip together, stick together. We challenge you to come along with your child to join a special class for parents and help develop that familial tie that comes from a shared interest.

Red Nose Day

Saturday17th March

(Kid’s only I’m afraid) Come to class dressed in red and get sponsored to help raise money for charity. Our aim is for the entire class to have done 6,000 back drops. The more students we have on the mat, the harder it becomes. If every student gets sponsored just £1 per drop we can really make a difference! Join the cause and make a difference, ask Sensei Matt for a sponsorship form.

Safety and Awareness Course

Friday 23rd March

The evening class will be a course in the more preventative measures we should take in our self defence and take a look at the sort of things that may have to be dealt with in the workplace as opposed to the street.

Black Belt Tests

Saturday 24th March

Those testing in march are yours truly (Sensei Matt) & Martin Watt.

Please come along to show your support for the work put in and the end result. Black belt is off ten seen as the ultimate goal in martial arts and as a result it is all to easy to lose your way once you have achieved this great trophy. Be part of the audience that you would hope for when it’s your turn.

That’s all folks.

Osu,

Sensei Matt, Shudokan Black Belt Academy – Aikido Nottingham

 

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News Update and Training Focus Monday 16th January

Training Focus

This week the focus is curriculum practice in preparation for grading next week.

Get your fist promotion of the year!

Dojo Demo and Open House

Saturday 21st January

This Saturday is the Kid’s demo. This is a great chance for your child to showcase their skills to friends, family and prospective members. Whether you want to see how well your child is doing or you are interested in seeing what we could do for your child come on down and cheer the kids on.

Kids’ Theme Day

Wednesday 8th February

He is courageous, he is daring, his is bold and he is brave. He is Puss, in boots.

 

 

 

 

 

We are having a Puss in Boots theme day to show our appreciation of the swashbuckling feline. Come in dressed up as Puss or one of his friends and have a great time.

Valentines Day

Wednesday 15th February

We know you parents like to get some time to yourselves so this Valentines day we are running a movie night so that you can leave the kids with us and treat yourselves to some peace and quiet.

Quote

Experience tells you what to do; confidence allows you to do it.”

Stan Smith

Osu

Sensei Matt, Shudokan Black Belt Academy – Aikido Nottingham

 

 

 

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